Group

Environment and Ecology

The Faculty of Life Science's Environment and Ecology research theme (Directed by Prof Richard Preziosi) focuses on applied research that addresses 21st century environmental challenges.

The food we eat, the water we drink, and the fuel that powers our industries are all dwindling resources that we harvest from the world around us. As our populations expand and natural areas are converted to farmland and cities, we lose the services that nature provided for free.

Keywords: 
Environment, Ecology, Biology, Biodiversity

Person

Prof Sabine Flitsch

Research interests:

Glycosciences, Biocatalysis, Monooxygenases, Protein-Ligand Interactions

Keywords: 
Biocatalysis, Chemicals, Chemistry, Biology, Health, Food

Person

Prof Richard Preziosi

One of the University's growing number of Sustainability Enthusiasts. Find out more about the initiative here.

I have a strong interest in conservation biology and field course teaching and I have taught on field courses for over 10 years. Much of my field work is done in the neotropics as part of conservation and development projects. I am a certified Senior Ecologist (ESA) and a Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society.

Keywords: 
Sustainability enthusiast, Workplace engagement, Engagement, Genetics, Biology, Trees, Biodiversity, Water, External engagement, Community, Conservation, Environment, Fieldwork, Teaching, Education, Development, Sustainability

Person

Dr Richard Huggett

Richard's current research addresses four basic questions:

How is the environment put together?

This theme considers ecological worldviews. It explores individual environmental components and the interdependence among them (see Huggett 1995, 1997, 2002 below).

How does the environment change?

This theme investigates evolutionary worldviews. It considers the ideas of development and evolution applied to individual environmental components and to the ecosphere as a whole (see Huggett 1997 below).

How fast does the environment change?

Keywords: 
Environment, Resilience, Philosophy, Geology, Catastrophes, Ecology, Evolution, Biology, Geography

Person

Dr Rachel Webster

Member of the university's Biodiversity group. Works at Manchester Museum's Herbarium.

Keywords: 
Plants, Biology, Sustainability, Climate, Climate change, Environment, Biodiversity

Person

Dr Peter Quayle

Varied lines of research have been investigated whilst at Manchester including the use of transition metal carbene complexes and organostannanes in synthesis, the synthesis of hydrophilic polymers, and the development of "clean oxidation" processes using hydrogen peroxide. Recent interests include the development of more efficient catalysts for atom transfer reactions and their use in natural product synthesis.

Keywords: 
Materials, Metals, Chemistry, Research methods, Polymers, Biology, Environment, Sustainability, Teaching, Education

Person

Prof Martin Gallagher

Research interests: Cloud Microphysics, Cloud-aerosol interactions, Surface Atmosphere Exchange, Micrometeorology, bioaerosols, Flux Applications, Airborne Instrumentation for ice and water.

Keywords: 
Weather, Physics, Water, Aerosols, Climate, Environment, Climate change, Biology, Heat flux, Thermal energy, Instrumentation, Sustainability, Teaching, Education

Person

Prof Matthew Cobb

My laboratory studies how the sense of smell works. To do this we use a rather unusual animal - a maggot. You and I have about 4 million smell cells in our noses. A maggot has just 21, and by using genetics we can make a maggot with just a single smell cell in its nose. By studying the behaviour of these animals, and the electrical activity of their smell cells, we can understand how smells are processed in the nose and in the brain. Not only does a maggot have a brain, the bits of its brain that process smells are wired up just like ours.

Keywords: 
Behaviour, Genetics, Smell, Health, Chemicals, Biology, History, Education, Biodiversity, Education for Sustainable Development

Person

Prof Nicholas Turner

Other project: Sustainable Laboratories

Keywords: 
Bioenergy, Energy, Renewable energy, Biotechnology, Biology, Technology, Biocatalysis, Biotransformation, Chemistry, Sustainability, Teaching, Education

Person

Prof Nigel Scrutton

Enzyme catalysts are central to life. They are the vehicles for delivering innovative bioscience solutions to chemicals manufacture, drug discovery, therapeutics and bioprocessing. They are the key enablers in the white biotechnology revolution, providing essential components in the new science of 'synthetic biology', offering new routes to biofuels, bulk and commodity chemicals and novel therapeutics.

Keywords: 
Quantum biology, Biology, Biocatalysis, Bioenergy, Renewable energy, Energy, Biotechnology

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