Person

Prof Stephanie Barrientos

Stephanie has researched and published widely on gender, global production, employment, decent work, trade and labour standards, corporate social responsibility, fair trade, and ethical trade.

Keywords: 
Political economy, Politics, Economy, Employment, Standards, Governance, Globalisation, Production, Gender, Business engagement, Social responsibility, Business, Consumption, Plants, Trees, Sustainability, Impact, Evaluation

Person

Dr Rachel Webster

Member of the university's Biodiversity group. Works at Manchester Museum's Herbarium.

Keywords: 
Plants, Biology, Sustainability, Climate, Climate change, Environment, Biodiversity

Person

Dr Patrick Gallois

There are many situations in a plant’s life when self-destruction of some cells is required. This may happen to create empty spaces inside tissues or when energy needs recycling for new growth or when a scorched earth policy is required to stop the progression of a pathogen. These situations occur during e.g. the germination of seeds, the differentiation of vascular elements, the reproduction and the senescence of plants and under pathogen attack. In all cases, a precise and spatially confined activation of cell death is required and can only been achieved by a complex genetic control.

Keywords: 
Bioenergy, Energy, Renewable energy, Biotechnology, Sustainability, Environment, Plants, Food, Resilience, Agriculture, Teaching, Education

Person

Dr Mohammad Rahman

I am primarily interested in plant physiology in terms of plants’ responses and interactions with the environment. I am especially keen to work on gas-exchange (photosynthesis, respiration and transpiration) and also resource-use efficiency across environmental gradients.

While doing my PhD I have investigated the effect of urban trees on adapting our cities to the urban heat island by measuring their growth and transpiration across environmental gradients. I have also attempted to carry out comparative ecophysiological studies on simulated changed climatic scenarios. 

Keywords: 
Cities, Biodiversity, Trees, Climate, Management, Environment, Resources, Sustainability, Mitigation, Urban heat island, Climate change, Resilience, Soil, Plants, Transpiration

Person

Prof Liz Sheffield

My research concerns mosses, liverworts and ferns in both natural and artificial environments. I am very interested in the reproductive processes of non-flowering plants, sporing behaviour in particular. Several current projects relate to conservation, including work on the environmental impact of herbicides.

Keywords: 
Plants, Biology, Conservation, Biodiversity, Environment, Impact, Chemicals, Sustainability, Teaching, Education

Person

Dr Keith White

I am interested in understanding and managing the water quality and ecology of urban watercourses, including preventing the formation of potentially harmful ‘blooms’ of blue-green algae. Work with an industrial partner is examining the relationship between past and present water quality and the changes in the ecology of Salford Quays – a restored and redeveloped dock system near Media City, Greater Manchester.

Keywords: 
Metals, Water, Pollution, Waste, Mining, Ecology, Environment, Plants, Biology, Animals, Sustainability, Teaching, Education

Person

Dr James Winterburn

My main research interest lies in the exploration of more efficient manufacturing methods for bio-based products, looking to industrial biotechnology to meet this aim. I am particularly interested in identifying ways to add value to existing bioprocesses through valorisation of by-products and waste streams. To date this research has centred on biosurfactants, surfactant molecules of microbial origin which are potentially more sustainable to source, manufacture, use and dispose of than petrochemical surfactants.

Keywords: 
Biosurfactant, Biology, Biotechnology, Production, Biomaterial, Polymers, Plants, Fermentation

Person

Dr Giles Johnson

Global climate change is resulting in changing weather patterns. For the UK, it is predicted that we will get warmer wetter winters and hotter drier summers. At the same time, there will be an increase in the frequency of extreme weather, including periods of droughts and heat waves, but also more storms and floods. This, combined with growing demand for food across the world, means that agriculture is facing unprecedented challenges. The crops used by farmers will have to change.

Keywords: 
Climate, Climate change, Carbon, Weather, Agriculture, Rural studies, Plants, Biology, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Ecology, Environment, Sustainability, Teaching, Education

Person

Dr Clare Robinson

Research interests: (1) Structure and function of fungal communities in soils and plant litter, (2) Biogeochemistry of Arctic and Antarctic soils, (3) Techniques to characterise the structure and function of the soil microbial community.

Keywords: 
Soil, Biology, Geology, Environment, Sustainability, Teaching, Education, Trees, Plants, Biodiversity

Person

Dr Caroline Bowsher

Plants unlike animals have the ability to produce their own food via Photosynthesis. This process takes part in the green parts of a plant – manly in the leaves. Photosynthesis produces carbohydrates, such as starch, and other important food products such as amino acids, proteins and fats. The chemical reactions producing these compounds are catalysed by enzymes found in a part of the cell called the chloroplast.

Keywords: 
Plants, Biology, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Sustainability, Teaching, Education

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