Person

Prof Matthew Cobb

My laboratory studies how the sense of smell works. To do this we use a rather unusual animal - a maggot. You and I have about 4 million smell cells in our noses. A maggot has just 21, and by using genetics we can make a maggot with just a single smell cell in its nose. By studying the behaviour of these animals, and the electrical activity of their smell cells, we can understand how smells are processed in the nose and in the brain. Not only does a maggot have a brain, the bits of its brain that process smells are wired up just like ours.

Keywords: 
Behaviour, Genetics, Smell, Health, Chemicals, Biology, History, Education, Biodiversity, Education for Sustainable Development

Person

Prof Krishna Persaud

Research interests in the area of olfaction from physiology to chemistry. Has been involved in the development of gas sensor arrays for sensing odours based on conducting polymers, that became commercialised by Aromascan plc, now Osmetech plc.

Keywords: 
Technology, Aerosols, Smell, Health, Polymers, Electric and electronics, Instrumentation, Biosensors, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Computer science, Sustainability, Teaching, Education, Aviation, Crime and security, Transport

Person

Prof Catherine McCrohan

Studies of invertebrate animals have long been used to increase our knowledge of how our own nervous system works. The reason such studies are useful is that the way nerve cells work is similar right across the animal kingdom, from invertebrates to humans.

Keywords: 
Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Animals, Neuroscience, Health, Smell, Metals, Pollution, Environment