Sustainability database

Groupings

Research Centre for Radwaste and Decommissioning

The RCRD is dedicated to research and training into the safe containment and disposal of radioactive wastes, the decommissioning of contaminated nuclear plant and the containment and remediation of radionuclides in the environment.

The RCRD provides a focal point for back-end nuclear activity at the University of Manchester, bringing together the research initiatives into Geological Disposal (Radwaste) supported by a BNFL endowment and Nuclear Engineering Decommissioning, supported by the NDA and EPSRC. Radionuclide contamination and behaviour, radiation damage, radionuclide behaviour in man-made and natural environments, and materials performance are all areas of investigation common to both research and training challenges.

Type: 
Institute
Acronym: 
RCRD

Connections

Person

Dr Abbie Jones

Dr Abbie Jones is a lecturer in Nuclear Engineering Decommissioning. Dr. Jones joined the University of Manchester in 2006, as a Post Doctoral Research Associate on the EPSRC Keeping the Nuclear Options Open consortium researching nuclear graphite behaviour. Her research specialises in decommissioning and treatment of irradiated nuclear graphite waste in order to understand irradiation damage processes to nuclear graphite and to validate new treatment methods for irradiated nuclear graphite post-closure.

Keywords: 
Nuclear energy, Nuclear waste, Energy, Carbon, Waste management, Sustainability, Teaching, Education

Person

Dr Nicholas Bryan

The main research area of my group is Environmental Chemistry, and in particular, the interaction of radionuclides with natural systems. Current projects involve the study of the interaction of these elements with natural colloids, including humic substances. Colloids have a high affinity for many pollutants, and can act as a vector for their migration in the environment. Lab experiments are used to study sorption and desorption mechanisms, and are backed up by work involving real samples from the field.

Keywords: 
Environment, Chemistry, Metals, Pollution, Nuclear energy, Radioactivity, Energy, Soil, Water, Geology, Waste, Impact, Nuclear waste, Sustainability, Teaching, Education

Person

Prof Jonathan Lloyd

I currently lead a multidisciplinary geomicrobiology group working at the interface between biology and geology. Our research focuses on the mechanisms of microbial metal reduction, with emphasis on the environmental impact and biotechnological applications of metal-reducing bacteria. Current activities are supported by funds from NERC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the EU and industry.

Keywords: 
Geology, Biology, Ecology, Metals, Materials, Nuclear waste, Radioactivity, Environment, Waste management, Bioremediation, Pollution, Chemistry, Sustainability, Teaching, Education

Person

Dr Dirk Engelberg

Dr Engelberg’s research group focuses on the development of multi-scale assessment approaches for the prediction, simulation and mitigation of environment-assisted degradation of stainless alloys in nuclear plant, radwaste and oil & gas environment. Dr. Engelberg has broad expertise in metallurgy, microstructure and grain boundary engineering, electrochemistry, and the application of in-situ characterisation techniques, including x-ray computed tomography, image analysis, and 2D/3D image and volume correlation.  

Keywords: 
Surface finishing, Materials, Nuclear waste, Radioactivity, Waste management, Metals, Corrosion, Energy, Thermal energy

Person

Prof Richard Pattrick

Research interests: 

Pure and applied mineralogy, geochemistry and metallogenesis. This work has ranged from experimental investigations to field studies. The mineralogical investigations have focussed on the chalcogenides (esp. sulfides) and magnetic oxides, using experimental synthesis combined with spectroscopic analysis, including synchrotron XAS and diffractiontechniques.

Keywords: 
Geology, Minerals, Metals, Sustainability, Teaching, Education

Person

Prof Katherine Morris

My current research focuses on the environmental behaviour of radioactive contaminants. Development of nuclear weapons and nuclear power has left a legacy of radioactively contaminated land and radioactive wastes that will be disposed of in a deep geological disposal facility. Understanding the behaviour of radioactive contaminants in these environments is essential in managing our radioactive legacy.

Keywords: 
Nuclear waste, Radioactivity, Waste management, Environment, Nuclear energy, Energy, Geology, Biology, Chemistry

Person

Prof Francis Livens

I work very closely with colleagues in other Schools of the University of Manchester, and also elsewhere. I work in several diverse areas, including Microbial transformations of radionuclides, Mineral surface reactions and Radionuclides in the 'real' environment

Keywords: 
Nuclear energy, Energy, Nuclear waste, Biology, Radioactivity, Minerals, Chemistry, Waste management